INTERweave: Extreme Fibers

Date: 
Thursday, November 7, 2013 (All day) to Wednesday, December 4, 2013 (All day)
Location: Art Gallery in Reisman Hall

Gallery closed for Thanksgiving recess November 27 - 29, 2013
Gallery re-opens for regular hours of operation December 2, 2013


The Artist Lecture Series & Reception will be held on Thursday, November 7 from 4 - 5:30 p.m.
 

Cazenovia College Art Gallery Exhibit INTERweave
A group exhibition of works by artists and designers that take fibers to the extreme

SPIN OFF :: a group of makers demonstrate their talents at looms, spinning wheels, hooks, needles and more! Join us with
your own threads at SPIN OFF, a Happening of sorts, during the opening reception!

Exhibiting Artists
Lauren Bristol :: Louise Charbonneau :: Anne Cofer :: Mary Giehl :: Megan Lawson Clark :: Susan Lenz :: Rebecca Mushtare :: Dorene Quinn :: Olivia Robinson :: Sarah Saulson :: Shari Urquhart :: Kim Waale :: Timothy Westbrook

Read about the artists and their work below.

Cherry Valley Spinners
A 100% hand spun and knit wool afghan will be on view that will be raffled. 100% of all proceeds to benefit Caz Cares.

The Artists

Lauren Briston

Lauren Briston

Biography
Lauren Bristol is a Fiber Artist who has worked with thread and string for 35 years. She studied art and education at The University of Texas at Austin, 1978 – 1984. After 20 years away, she returned to Syracuse in 1997. She has maintained a studio since 1981. Bristol’s work is primarily sculptural coiled basketry. She also works in braiding, plying, quilting, crochet and wood. Lauren Bristol lives and works in Dewitt. She is a self-taught Fiber Artist who continues to explore the possibilities.

Artist Statement
To be Inspired by an Idea ...
{I-Dea ... the In-Dwelling Divine}
To hold the the Idea with Enthusiasm ...
{Enthusiasm ... Extravagant Spiritual Emotion}
To nurture it ... feel it grow and take shape ...
To birth it into Being with my hands ...
To see its form, complete and gravid with meaning.

Twisting, plying, braiding, weaving
String Things ... skirt, mantle, quipu ...
Vibrating objects of consciousness born from archaic memory ...
Re-Membered.

Fashioning firm form from flexible fiber ...
Coiled Basketry.
The object a body ... Containing I-Dea.
A technique dating far into prehistory ...
An unbroken line of Makers.

Lumpy sapling ... peeled, dried, carved
Reveals a vine buried deep in its folds.
Vine uncovered ... sapling recovered,
The spiral bones of the Sacred Grove
polished and wanting Touch.

This joyful process of creation ...
A reflection of the mysterious congruence of etymology, quantum physics,
mythology, human artifacts, the dance of life ...
Metaphors of Being remaining relevant through millennia ...
Spiritual clues that spin new strands in the Web of Possibility.

Through 33 years of working with fibers,
thousands of hours loving this rhythmic and meditative act ...
Necessarily a spiritual practice ...
Being In the Moment, yet Aware of the Flow.

Louise Charbonneau

Louise Charbonneau

Biography
Louise Charbonneau started quilting by making whole cloth quilts 15 years ago and has had a quilt in progress ever since. A librarian by profession, she lives and works in Utica, NY. This is her first exhibition.

Artwork
Conceived as bed covers, these quilts are machine pieced and hand quilted. Old feed sacks and reclaimed vintage cotton prints were the inspiration for the designs, which also feature several yarn-dyed fabrics. Large expanses of plain muslin are used to create a contrasting sense of sparseness and restraint.

Anne Cofer

Anne Cofer

Biography
Anne Cofer is currently an adjunct faculty member of the department of Fiber and Material Studies at Syracuse University. She received ‘Best in Show’ at the 2008 Everson Biennial and her first museum solo show 'Concealed Objects' was held at the Everson Museum of Art in 2009. Her work has been published in Ceramics Monthly, Ceramics Art and Perception, the New York Times and appears in the Lark Books publication entitled '500 Ceramic Sculptures'.

Artist Statement
My studio practice investigates the unique relationship between clay and cloth. This relationship exists on many levels, from the physical properties of the materials to the resonances implicit their language. When combined, the slabs of clay and sheets of cloth form a reciprocal relationship, one material wholly reliant on the other to create form. The work appears to move backwards and forwards between cloth and clay as armature, the clay supporting the cloth skin or the cloth armature containing the clay body.

Usually, the clay is unfired and installed wet, fixing the installation in time and place. The enormous weight conveys a disconcerting presence; however, the feeling of presence is disrupted by an inherent fragility. The clay will dry and can only maintain its current form if left undisturbed. Subsequently the work oscillates between stability and fragility and the viewer is left moving backwards and forwards between the present and the absent, a physical object and the memory of its time and place.

The cloth I uses is rooted in the home and a female past. Consequently, the cloth redefines the clay within a domestic context and the clay adds a physical weight to the cloth, revealing an emotional quality that speaks of everyday experience. Similarly the repetitive processes of stacking, folding and lifting, evident in the work convey an enormous physical effort suggestive of daily household chores and mundane domestic labors. These activities imply a backwards and forwards motion, as the tasks repeat themselves over and over. The stains left on the cloth by the clay body beneath compound this pattern. The cloth will never be clean, rendering the work futile and the laborer to an endless cycle of movement, "forward, then backward, then forward, then backward, over and over again".

Mary Giehl

Website: www.marygiehl.com

Mary Giehl

Biography
Mary Giehl was a Registered Nurse for 22 years working in the Pediatric ER and Pediatric ICU. In 1985 she returned to school to study Fiber Arts at Syracuse University. She graduate in 1989 with her BFA in Fiber Arts, and received her Master’s in Fine Arts in Sculpture in 1992. Mary taught part time at Syracuse University in Sculpture and Fiber/Materials Studies till 2011 and now spends her time in her studio.

She has had solo shows at the Phoenix Gallery, NYC, Delaware Center for Contemporary Arts, Wilmington, DE, Rochester Contemporary, Rochester NY, Chase Gallery, Boston, Marion Royael Gallery, Beacon NY and many others. She has been included in many group exhibitions. She has been the recipient of many grants.

Artist Statement
My work presently has focused on looking at elements that affect many of us in a universal way. I have been looking at organisms specially those that contaminate drinking water causing children around the world many health problems. I look at the organisms microscopically and then recreate them using different types of fibers, crocheting them. When looking at the organisms they have a really beauty to them and they become quite painterly to me.

I am not interested in just the images but how something that is so destructive can also be so beautiful. Using crochet thread adds to the idea that these are very fragile elements that we must deal with on a daily bases.

Megan Lawson Clark

Biography
Megan began sewing at an early age and has always loved working by hand with fabrics, especially using couture sewing techniques. She completed Graduate School at Syracuse University in Fashion and Textile Design. In her final thesis work she researched the history of the wedding trousseau and completed six wedding ensembles with accessories. Prior to that Megan worked in the many facets of retail management including visual merchandizing, showroom sales, and store management.

Megan began a small business in 2003, specializing in the design and creation of hand painted scarves and floorcloths. She has always been intrigued by fabrics and current fashions. Currently she is interested in computer aided patternmaking and textile design as a medium for creating pieces. Megan is the annual Fashion Show Director, this is a juried show which is part of a course. The fashion show attracts over a thousand people yearly and involves three hundred students in the creation of the production throughout the year.

Susan Lenz

Website: www.susanlenz.com

Susan Lenz

Biography
Susan Lenz is a professional studio artist in Columbia, South Carolina. Generally using needle and thread for self-expression, Susan works to articulate the accumulated memory inherent in discarded things. She seeks a partnership with her materials, their purposes, values, and familiar associations. Her fiber artwork has been widely exhibited in international and national juried exhibitions and as solo installations all over the country.

Susan has been awarded fellowships to attend art residencies at the MacNamara Foundation in Maine, Studios Midwest in Illinois, Hot Springs National Park in Arkansas and the Studios of Key West in southern Florida. She has been engaged for workshops at Slippery Rock University, The Studios of Key West, and the Society of Contemporary Crafts in Pittsburgh, PA. Susan’s works have claimed three "Best of Show" awards in the fine craft competition, Palmetto Hands. Other first place ribbons were earned in the 2011 National Heritage Quilt Show at the McMinn County Living Heritage Museum in Athens, TN and in the 2011 Wearable Arts Awards in Port Moody, British Columbia as well as in the Will's Creek Survey, Cumberland, MD. Susan is represented by the Grovewood Gallery in Asheville, NC and Michele Tuegel Contemporary in St. Petersburg, FL with work that has won the 2011 Niche Award for decorative fibers and is a finalist in the 2013 competition.

Artist Statement
Generally using needle and thread for self-expression, Susan Lenz works to articulate the accumulated memory inherent in discarded things. She seeks a partnership with her materials, their purposes, values, and familiar associations. Memory, universal mortality, and personal legacy are central themes. Vintage and recycled materials are combined with meticulous handwork. Susan is drawn to textiles for their tactile qualities and often makes work that is meant to touch and be touched.

Rebecca Mushtare

Website: www.cyberthread.net

Rebecca Mushtare

Biography
Rebecca Mushtare is a visual artist based in Oswego, NY. Although she earned her MFA in Computer Art from Syracuse University, she works with a variety of digital and fiber materials and methods. Her work has been exhibited in a variety of venues locally, regionally and nationally. Most recently her work was included in Bits and Pieces at Lapham Gallery (NY), a small group exhibition at Buckham Gallery (MI), Interwoven: Art. Craft. Design. at the Arlington Arts Center (VA) and a solo exhibition at Rome Art and Community Center (NY). She is currently a full-time faculty member at SUNY Oswego.

Artist Statement
Plastic shopping bags are artifacts of commodification in our culture. I deconstruct, repurpose and remix these artifacts into new narratives, messages and commentary in my work. The strategies I use to create new pieces are in direct response to qualities like stretchiness, transparency, pattern and symbolism of individual bags. Each stitch into the plastic is a very deliberate act; each stitch is a commitment that cannot be reversed. I enjoy the stress the meticulous repetitive actions induce and the reinvention that results from occasionally losing control.

Dorene Quinn

Dorene Quinn

Artist Statement
I am an artist who typically works with materials gathered from nature, and often generate my projects specifically in response to sites and landscapes. My goal is to create a dialog about nature and human desire, and the tensions between the natural and the human made world. Laboriously crafted objects and props are typically a part of my activities, and these are often created to help me integrate my presence as a human in nature. Raw material is obsessively collected and gathered on expeditions through natural sites and other more urban environments that I live or work in. These processes force me to slow down and fully experience the world, and they become a daily discipline not unlike meditation. In these personal interactions with the world through my activities and artworks, I work to present the fragility of nature and our ambivalent relationship with it, with compassion, humor and reverence.

Olivia Robinson

Website: poyaisgroup.org

Deathworks of May Elizabeth Kramner
The Deathworks of May Elizabeth Kramner, 2011
Mixed media installation
Tents, pavilions, text, self-performing reed organs, incandescent light bulbs

Biography

Olivia Robinson is a multimedia artist whose work spans performance, installation, research, and community engagement. Robinson’s diverse body of work, which ranges in scale from hand-built textile circuits to architectural-scale inflatable structures, investigates issues of justice, identity, community, and transformation. She has received awards and honors from the National Endowment for the Arts, the New York State Council on the Arts, the Franklin Furnace Fund, the Harpo Foundation, the New York Foundation for the Arts, Sculpture Space, and the Center for Land Use Interpretation. She lives and works in Baltimore, Maryland.

Artwork
The Deathworks of May Elizabeth Kramner is a mixed media installation by The Poyais Group (Jesse Ball, Thordis Bjornsdottir, Olivia Robinson, and Jesse Stiles). According to these artists, May Elizabeth Kramner (1867-1977) was a recluse and an artist of the type now dubbed "outsider." Her life work consisted of a model of the town in which she lived. Each house was represented by a tent and on each tent was sewn the manner of death of a person (or persons) who lived in that house at some time during her life.

May Elizabeth's work was witnessed by no person outside of her immediate family during her lifetime. After her passing, the Deathworks were discovered by Charles and Dorothy Winright, the acclaimed anthropologists, but were destroyed in a fire shortly thereafter. In 2011, The Poyais Group recreated the artworks based upon Dorothy Winwright's notes from her initial survey of May Elizabeth's tents and pavilions.

"We hope that the brilliant striving of this hermit may prove inspirational to others in this complicated time. We hope too that our tent-city will delight and astonish." - The Poyais Group, March 2011

Sarah Saulson

Website: www.sarahsaulson.com

Sarah Saulson

Biography

Sarah Saulson currently teaches weaving at Syracuse University. She began weaving during her childhood in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and has never stopped. As an undergraduate she studied Athropology at Wellesley College, which has led to her interest in working with weavers in the developing world, both in Ghana and Guatemala. This has also informed her studio practice, and her current interest in the universal nature of cloth and human experience through both space and time. For many years, Sarah maintained a full-time dyeing and weaving production studio, selling her work throughout the northeast. She teaches adult weavers in guilds and at conferences throughout the United States. She also works with children through artist residencies, especially at the Montessori School of Syracuse. Her current studio practice focuses on weaving heirloom-quality Jewish prayer shawls.

Artist Statement
In this series, I investigate the connection between weaving, which is 7,000 years old, and modern technologies and their artifacts. I was inspired by textiles from the archeological record, aged, torn and eroded remnants, made precious and meaningful by their very survival and how they recall past lives and cultures. My weavings make use of objects that until recently were used or worn daily but are now fading from our world. Until the Industrial Revolution, weaving, spinning and stitching was fundamentally necessary daily work that took place in virtually every home world-wide. In our post-industrial age, weaving is rarely experienced. Similarly, as culture and technology quickly evolves, once ubiquitous objects quickly become things of the past. The mass-produced materials that I chose to work with are now also quickly disappearing, removed from everyday experience and becoming collectors’ items or just memories. I have sought to make cloth that also feels precious, celebrating and memorializing our connections to materiality and the passage of time.

Shari Urquhart

Shari Urquhart

Kim Waale

Kim Waale

Biography
Kim Waale has been an artist-in-residence in Spain (2010), Macedonia (2008), and Ecuador (2007) and has received grants and residencies from organizations including I-Park, Sculpture Space, Light Work, the International Studio and Curatorial Program in NYC, the Saltonstall Foundation and the Millay Colony. In addition to recent exhibitions at the Everson Museum and the Warehouse Gallery in Syracuse and Memorial Art Gallery in Rochester (where her work won multiple prizes), her work has been shown in at Hallwalls Contemporary Art Center in Buffalo, the A. I. R. Gallery in NYC, the McCormick Freedom Museum in Chicago, and museums and galleries in Wales, Bulgaria, Macedonia and Spain. In 2003, she co-authored the book A Due Voci: The Photography of Rita Hammond (Syracuse University Press) with Dr. Ann Ryan and Dr. Julie Grossman. She is a Professor and the Director of Studio Art at Cazenovia College in Cazenovia, NY.

Artist Statement
My work explores how we re-present the natural world--expressing both our closeness to and distance from nature. Western culture is rife with artificial representations of nature that are inviting and popular. Increasingly, nature is an idea, a cultural construction, and a commodity. This installation artificially replicates a spider’s web through the use of ordinary household plastic wrap which has been hand spun using a drop spindle.

Timothy Westbrook

Timothy Westbrook
Alexis Rose
Woven cassette tape fabric, velvet from Mrs. Clause’s costume with discarded roses
$8,000

Biography

Timothy Westbrook is a sustainability driven fiber artist who hails from Wanakena, NY. A graduate from Syracuse University's fiber arts program he moved to Milwaukee, WI to be the first out-of-state and youngest Artist-In-Residence at the Pfister Hotel in 2012. Just one month after his residency ended he was cast for Season 12 of Project Runway. His work focuses on the "expiration date of stuff." Why do we decide when objects are "garbage?" All of his work is made from repurposed materials using non-electric equipment and other sustainable studio practices.

Artwork
Timothy Westbrook’s "Alexis Rose" was one of the gowns created during his residency at the Pfister Hotel. The gown is woven from the magnetic ribbon inside of audio-cassette tapes. This showcases Timothy’s interest in exploring the potential of form and the human silhouette.