Social and Behavioral Sciences

SB 110 Introduction to Anthropology
3 credits (AS)

This introductory course undertakes a cross-cultural survey of basic principles and concepts in anthropology. Anthropological fieldwork techniques, culture and communications, the organization of society, family structure, and religious beliefs are among the topics presented. (Offered annually)

SB 120 Introduction to Psychology
3 credits (AS)

The focus of this course is on the scientific study of human behavior and mental processes, and how they are affected by environment, experience and physiology. Students are introduced to a variety of psychological terms, concepts and approaches. (Offered fall and spring terms)

SB 121 Child Psychology
3 credits (AS)
The focus of this course is on human development from conception through the middle years of childhood. The developmental aspects of the child’s physical, emotional, social, personality, language and cognitive growth are presented. The impact of family, peers, and other environmental influences on the child are also investigated. Prerequisite: SB 120 Introduction to Psychology

SB 122 Adolescent Psychology
3 credits (AS)
This course focuses on the characteristics, needs and problems of adolescence. Biological, cognitive, societal, familial and peer influences on behavior are among the topics covered. Prerequisite: SB 120 Introduction to Psychology

SB 123 Adult Psychology
3 credits (AS)

The developmental process of aging, including family adjustment, marriage, single adults, biological changes, intellectual development, retirement, senescence and death are addressed in this course. The focus is on the bio-physiological and psychosocial forces that affect adult development. Prerequisite: SB 120 Introduction to Psychology

SB 130 Introduction to Sociology
3 credits (AS)

The course provides an overview of the study of society through an exploration of social structure and social change. Topics include culture, family, religion, deviance, race and ethnicity, gender inequality, sexuality, social stratification, as well as contemporary issues. (Offered fall and spring terms)

ED 151 The American High School: Identity and Difference in Schools
3 credits (CS)

This course focuses on the construction of the American High School and its historical, philosophical and sociological underpinnings.  It examines identity and difference in the American High School, focusing on the social construction of identity, and the impact of prejudice and discrimination (on the basis of class, race, gender and disability) on  the social, psychological and educational well-being of adolescents. The course is designed to address the Cazenovia College's general education competency in Diversity and Social Consciousness which, according to the Cazenovia College catalog, aims, “[t]o demonstrate an awareness of the diversity that exists among all human groups, and to develop the necessary skills to understand diverse cultures and traditions.”

SB 201 Multicultural Contributions to American Society   
3 credits (AS)

The purpose of this course is to foster a better understanding of the rich diversity of cultural experiences that constitute American society. Using an interdisciplinary approach, various aspects of American history are examined from the perspective of the minority peoples themselves. Contemporary multicultural issues are also examined within the context of their historical framework. (Offered fall and spring terms)

SB 204 Positive Psychology
3 credits (AS)

This course provides an in-depth overview of positive psychology. Human resiliency, coping, strengths, resources and wellness are all central to the field of positive psychology, an area of scientific study dedicated to maximizing human potential and well-being. Students are engaged in understanding the conceptual, empirical, and practical aspects of this field of study and its growing contributions to the general field of psychology. (Offered every other year) Prerequisite: SB 120 Introduction to Psychology.

SB 206 History & Sociology of the American Family     
3 credits (AS)

This is a social history course, which uses sociological concepts to examine historical changes in the functions of American families and the lives of family members. Inquiries will address questions about rapid social change as it relates to (1) changes in the structures and functions of American families, (2) changes in the roles assumed by and role-conflicts experienced by children and adult family members, and (3) changes in the life cycles of family members. Students will examine the impact of major societal transformations—from hunting and gathering to sedentary agrarian to urban industrial/technological—upon family functions and upon the social experiences and development of children, adolescent and adult family members. (Offered on a rotating basis) Prerequisite: EN 101 or permission of the instructor

SB 221 Psychology of Women
3 credits (AS)
This course focuses on many topics important to women that are omitted or abbreviated in traditional psychology courses. These topics include the development of sex-typing, women and work, women’s health issues, pregnancy, and motherhood. The course attempts to discriminate between constitutional and environmentally produced differences between the sexes in order to better understand behavior and personality. Prerequisite: SB 120 Introduction to Psychology

SB 225 Lifespan Developmental Psychology
3 credits (AS)
This course reviews development through the entire lifespan. Each developmental stage - from fetal growth, infancy, toddlerhood, childhood, adolescence, young adulthood, middle age, and maturity – will be discussed in terms of cognitive, social, emotional, and physical changes. Theoretical approaches to psychological development are also presented. Prerequisite: SB 120 Introduction to Psychology

SB 231 Social Problems
3 credits (AS)

Contemporary social problems are explored through theoretical concepts of social disorganization, deviance and value conflicts. Topics include mental health, drugs and alcohol, juvenile delinquency, crime, criminal justice, stratification, racism, aging, population growth, gender roles, health care, education, the environment and the family. (Offered fall and spring terms) Prerequisite: SB 130 Introduction to Sociology or permission of the instructor

SB 232 Sociology of Gender
3 credits (AS)

This course examines influences that social structure and social change have on gender roles in modern societies. The course challenges students to examine their preconceptions about what it means to be women and men in modern societies, develops an understanding of cultural influences on women’s and men’s development, deepens their insights into the nature of women’s and men’s roles in society, and explores the future of gender roles and personal options. (Offered on a rotating basis) Prerequisite: SB 130 Introduction to Sociology

SB 234 Social Psychology
3 credits (AS)

This course introduces students to the social approach in the discipline of psychology. The course focuses on how the presence of other people influences one’s behavior and mental processes. Topics investigated include: social cognition, social influence and social relations. Students learn basic issues and methodologies prevalent in social psychology. They also evaluate social problems and examine their own beliefs and behaviors from a social psychology perspective. (Offered annually) Prerequisite: SB 120 Introduction to Psychology or SB 130 Introduction to Sociology

SB 250 Cultural Geography
3 credits (AS)
The purpose of this class is to provide an introduction to the concepts of human geography. This will involve the study of population trends and migration patterns; cultural, and ethnic differences; economic activity and settlement patterns; and of human environment interactions. Comprehensive map work is an integral part of the course. (Offered annually)

SB 260 Human Sexuality
3 credits (AS)

Human Sexuality is designed to help students better understand sexuality and sexual behavior in themselves and others. Emphasis is on the interrelationship of biology and psychology. The course examines a variety of social issues relevant to sexual attitudes and behaviors.

SB 265 Alcohol and Other Drugs in Modern Society
3 credits (AS)

This course assists students in understanding the role and impact of alcohol and other drugs in today’s society. Topics included are historical and societal trends, political and economic issues of treatment, the nature of addictions, their effects on the family, and prevention and intervention methods. (Offered annually) Prerequisite: SB 120 Introduction to Psychology or SB 130 Introduction to Sociology

SB 268 Community Psychology and Social Change
3 credits (AS)

This course examines how communities function and change through social and environmental factors. The changing roles of psychologists in community-oriented work and the development and evaluation of programs for the elimination of a variety of problems in living are discussed. Prerequisite: SB 110 Introduction to Anthropology, SB 120 Introduction to Psychology or SB 130 Introduction to Sociology

SB 285 Liberal Studies Internship
3 credits (CS)

The Liberal Studies internship is an elective course that gives liberal studies students the opportunity to test career options related to their area of study. The internship includes a set of preliminary class meetings on professional conduct and their connections to liberal arts study. Seminars accompany the internships to allow for exchange of information about students’ internship experiences. The College makes final arrangements for the internship placement and provides transportation when possible. This course does not satisfy General Education or distribution requirements in the SB area. (Offered fall and spring terms) Prerequisites: A minimum grade of "C" in EN 101 Academic Writing I and CM 121 Effective Speaking, sophomore status, and permission of instructor

SB 301 Models of Society
3 credits (AS)
In this interdisciplinary course, students analyze and apply theoretical models drawn from the social sciences including, but not limited to, geography, economics, history and political science. Topics discussed include the impact of geography on economic and environmental issues, international economic systems and theories, individual and collective economic and political decision-making, political systems and theories, and manifestations of authoritative and subaltern status in national and international contexts. (Offered alternate years)

SB 311 Contemporary Ethnic Families
3 credits (AS)

This course examines the manner in which race, class and ethnicity affect family functioning styles in relation to a number of societal institutions. Students will be exposed to an overview of the uniquely diverse mixture of backgrounds found in American family life, and will examine their own ethno-cultural backgrounds to determine their impact on life experiences and choices. Students will also consider practical issues of applying the knowledge of ethno-cultural factors to their particular major. (Offered spring term) Prerequisite: SB 110 Introduction to Anthropology or SB 130 Introduction to Sociology or SB 120 Introduction to Psychology or SB 201 Multicultural Contributions

SB 322 Psychology Applied to Organizational Behavior
3 credits (AS)

This course explores the complexity of behavior within organizational settings and helps students develop the social interaction abilities necessary for professional success. Specific areas of focus include group dynamics, inter-group relations, interview skills, familiarity with testing in industry, organizational communication, person-machine interactions and effective styles of leadership. Prerequisite: SB 120 Introduction to Psychology or SB 130 Introduction to Sociology

SB 323 Abnormal Psychology
3 credits (AS)

This course is an introduction to the issues and problems associated with defining, understanding, and relating to maladaptive behavior. The major schools of thought and systems of classifying abnormal behavior are presented and discussed. Questions relating to diagnosis, treatment and research are raised and societal issues concerning maladaptive behavior are examined. (Offered fall term) Prerequisite: SB 120 Introduction to Psychology

SB 324 Childhood Disorders
3 credits (AS)
This course considers basic issues in the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of common behavioral disorders and developmental deviation. Topics included are antisocial behavior, hyperactivity, autism, mental retardation, and specific learning disabilities. Students examine possible short-term and long-term consequences of these disorders for both the child and his or her family. Prerequisites: SB 120 Introduction to Psychology and SB 121 Child Psychology or SB 122 Adolescent Psychology

SB 325 Educational Psychology
3 credits (AS)

This course is a study of psychological principles and research as applied to classroom organization, teaching, learning and the various psychological tests used in the school setting. Prerequisite: SB 120 Introduction to Psychology

SB 326 Personality Theories
3 credits (AS)

This course provides an overview of the nature of personality theory as well as comprehensive summaries of specific theories of personality. Works of Freud, Adler, Jung, Horney, Sullivan, Fromm, and others are considered. Students examine theories concerning the nature and development of human personality and the factors producing integration or disorientation. The course also examines personality dynamics in relationship to stress, frustration, and conflict. (Offered spring term) Prerequisite: SB 120 Introduction to Psychology

SB 327 Brain and Behavior
3 credits (AS)

The known universe’s most amazing organ, the brain, is explored in this course; specifically, its role in lower-level functions to sustain basic drives and upper-level functions to enable thinking, speaking, and perceiving is considered. (Offered spring term) Prerequisite: SB 120 Introduction to Psychology
 
SB 329 Women and Culture
3 credits (AS)

This course will look at crucial aspects of the role of women in selected global societies, including the United States. Using an interdisciplinary approach, changes in social roles and expectations of women in more traditional societies are compared with women in newly and advanced industrialized countries. Students research gender issues in a particular culture or country of their choice. (Offered on a rotating basis) Prerequisites: EN 101 Academic Writing I, EN 201Academic Writing II and CM 121 Effective Speaking

SB 330 Sensation and Perception
3 credits (AS)

How do we see and hear? How does the brain make sense of all the sensory input it gets to produce the rich perceptual world we experience? Through lectures, in-class demonstrations, and discussions, students learn how the anatomy and physiology of the eye and ear (and related parts of the brain) allow us to understand speech, perceive color, see motion and depth, and even recognize faces. Prerequisite: SB 120 Introduction to Psychology

SB 333 Human Rights and Genocide
3 credits (AS)

This course will examine the United Nation’s Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and consider violations of human rights in the form of genocidal atrocities. The course introduces students to the major debates surrounding the study of genocide and how genocide should be defined. It will look at major theories explaining genocide; students will consider the uniqueness of each case in order to look for potential consistent patterns. A focus on the prevention of future genocide is included. Readings on the Armenians in Turkey, the Sudan, the Holocaust, Rwanda, Cambodia, the former Yugoslavia, and the experiences of Native Americans are required. (Offered on a rotating basis) Prerequisites: EN 101 Academic Writing I and EN 201 Academic Writing II or permission of the instructor

SB 335 Comparative Social Institutions in the United States
3 credits (AS)
Students examine the key social and cultural institutions in the United States today: family, religion, education, politics, and the economy. These institutions are examined in terms of historical origins, underlying values, current functions and possible future evolution. The course includes an analysis of how individuals participate in American society through these social institutions. The experiences of selected subcultures are also examined. (Offered fall term)

SB 336 Social Welfare Policies
3 credits (AS)
This course introduces students to the theories and methods used to analyze the policies of American social welfare. Students will focus on various social welfare programs, such as income maintenance and employment, the American health care system, child welfare policy, housing policies and others. Students will learn about the development of policy, the relationship between social problems and social policy, and ideologies that affect policy decision-making. (Offered spring term)

SB 341 Learning
3 credits (AS)

This course is a thorough introduction to the major theories of learning. As well as touching upon the work of Pavlov, Thorndike, Hull, Skinner, Tolman, and others, the course will cover such specific topics as habituation, classical conditioning, instrumental conditioning, stimulus control, aversive control, schedules of reinforcement, choice behavior, learning set, rule learning, place learning, and observational learning. The course will also stress practical applications of these principles (e.g., token economies, systematic desensitization, etc.). Prerequisite: SB 120 Introduction to Psychology

SB 355 Criminology and Delinquency
3 credits (AS)

This course is an examination of crime and delinquency causation. Topics include the extent of, types of, and societal reactions to crime and delinquency. The course reviews the problems in measuring the incidence of crime and delinquency. Prerequisites: SB 120 Introduction to Psychology, SB 130 Introduction to Sociology, CJ 151 Introduction to Criminal Justice Functions and Processes, and SB 231 Social Problems

SB 358 Sport in Society
3 credits (AS)

This course examines sports through a sociological lens. A critical examination of the impact on sports and society includes a discussion of the cultural, political and economic aspects of sports.

SB 359 Forensic Psychology
3 credits (CS)

This course is an introduction to the science and practice of psychology as applied to the law and the criminal justice system. The major concepts, theories, and research findings in psychology as they relate to a broad range of legal issues, including the function and participants of the legal system, crime and criminal investigation, civil and criminal cases, and ethics, will be examined. (Offered every other year) Prerequisite: SB 120 Introduction to Psychology

SB 360 Environment and Behavior
3 credits (AS)

This is an empirical and research-based study of the relation of the physical environment to psychological processes and interpersonal behavior. Topic areas include privacy, territoriality, crowding, environmental stress, environmental design in organizational settings, and the psychology of architecture. The course considers research strategies and findings on the behavioral and attitudinal aspects of living and working environments.
 
SB 361 Death, Dying and Bereavement
3 credits (AS)
The course examines psychological, social, and biological conceptualizations and consequences of dying, death and grief in contemporary society, with a special emphasis on examining one’s own feelings and attitudes towards death.

SB 364 Cognition
3 credits (AS)

This course is an advanced introduction into the study of mental representations and processes. The topics covered include perception, attention, memory, language, concept formation, and decision-making. The course covers relevant theories and research findings and relates course content to real-world applications. Prerequisite: SB 120 Introduction to Psychology.

SB 365 Drugs and Human Behavior
3 credits (AS)

This course deals with the history, mechanisms of action, short- and long-term effects, side effects, and uses and abuses of drugs that affect behavior. The drugs considered are alcohol, major and minor tranquilizers, antidepressants and stimulants, including cocaine, amphetamines and other commonly abused drugs. Prerequisite: SB 120 Introduction to Psychology

SB 375 Methods of Inquiry
3 credits (AS)

This course is designed to increase students’ understanding of the research process and to enable them to effectively evaluate research in their chosen field of study. The overall objective is to assist students in developing the multi-faceted skills necessary to become effective consumers of research. The study is directed toward teaching students how to evaluate, rather than conduct, research studies. These evaluation skills prepare students to respond to research presented in journals, professional interaction and the daily communication of information in today’s society. (Offered annually)

SB 377 Research Methods: Psychology
3 credits (AS)

This class gives students first-hand experience with empirical data. Students gain knowledge of scientific methodology and gain experience in organizing and interpreting observations from psychological experiments. They also gain experience in writing research reports and APA style. The course includes introductory lectures on experimental design, the performance of several research projects, the analyses of these projects using SPSS, and the preparation of research reports. Prerequisite: SB 120 Introduction to Psychology, SM 261 Statistics

SB 380 Contemporary Slavery in the World
3 credits (AS)

For thousands of years people have been enslaved. Ancient Egypt, ancient Greece, and the Roman and Inca Empires all made slavery an integral part of their social systems. What many do not realize is that slavery exists in many parts of the world today. This course will address the present day issues of slavery, including the new forms it has taken. It will look at the research into slaves, work being done to abolish it, and various case studies of existing slavery. (Offered on a rotating basis) Prerequisites: EN 101 Academic Writing I and EN 201 Academic Writing II or permission of the instructor

SB 385 Internship I
6 credits (CS)

Internships consist of off-campus fieldwork based on a learning contract signed by the student, agency supervisor and faculty director. The student participates in internship seminar meetings and an annual group presentation of internship experiences. A written evaluation of the experience is required of the student and agency. The student develops a final report that synthesizes the internship and academic activities. (Offered annually) Prerequisites: CM 301 Speech and Rhetoric, SB 234 Social Psychology, and HU 361 Commitment and Choice

SB 401 World Cultures and Societies
3 credits (AS)

Selected societies are presented as unique entities with their own values and histories. Broad cultural and contemporary global issues are related to the cultures under consideration. Possible topics include cultural change and survival; colonialism and decolonialism; ideologies and belief systems; gender, class, and race and ethnic relations; social institutions, including the family, education, government and politics, and economy; rural and urban life; and international relations.

SB 425 Psychology of Advertising
3 credits (AS)

The course examines the role of mass media and effects of advertising on cultural value systems. Behavioral, psychological and physiological reactions in consumer behavior are explored, with a focus on understanding the impact of media and advertising on both the individual and on society. Prerequisite: SB 120 Introduction to Psychology or SB 130 Introduction to Sociology

SB 430 Social Theory
3 credits (AS)

Social Theory is a course designed to expose students to the historical evolution of modern social science as well as to introduce some of the issues that are prominent in the social sciences today. Noted social theorists and their theories will be discussed in order to examine them as products of past societies as well as to consider their utility for and relevance to the contemporary world. Noted social philosophers and early social scientists will be discussed. Although some of the material may have been read previously, it will be read and analyzed through the lens of a social scientist. At the same time, students read contemporary material that focuses on the broader questions of society. (Offered on a rotating basis) Prerequisite: Minimum of four SB courses (excluding psychology courses) or permission of the instructor

SB 436 Class, Status and Power
3 credits (AS)

This course examines prominent views of social stratification using a social-issues perspective, focusing primarily on contemporary American issues and events. Topics include an interdisciplinary examination of social stratification; characteristics such as race, gender, and ethnicity that often determine social stratification; and their impact on individuals and American society. International case studies of social stratification are also analyzed. (Offered alternate years in the fall)

SB 451 Criminology
3 credits (AS)
This course reviews the relationship between deviant behavior and the problems of social control, by examining the jurisprudence of criminal law in the context of criminological theory, analyzing the arrangements and justifications for social control, corrections, and rehabilitation. Students explore the relationship between the rule of law and individual rights. Serial killings and infamous crimes are examined in detail. Prerequisite: CJ 151 Introduction to Criminal Justice Functions and Processes or permission of the instructor

SB 485 Internship II
3 credits (CS)

Internships consist of off-campus field work based on a learning contract signed by the student, agency supervisor and faculty director. The student participates in internship seminar meetings and an annual group presentation of internship experiences. A written evaluation of the experience is required of the student and agency. The student develops a final report that synthesizes the internship and academic activities. (Offered fall and spring terms) Prerequisite: SB 385 Internship I

SB 489 Independent Professional Study
3 credits (CS)
This course may take a variety of forms: studio, portfolio, research project, or intense reading and a major paper. Characterized by a mentoral or preceptoral relationship, the course places significant demand on the student’s capacity for independent critical thought.

SB 495 Social Change and Social Planning
3 credits (AS)

Students study ways to identify and implement necessary changes in social institutions. This course concentrates on planning and strategy in the development processes of social organizations, including private corporations, public institutions, and national economies, at different levels of scale and complexity. (Offered on a rotating basis). Prerequisites: SB 130 Introduction to Sociology or SB 110 Introduction to Anthropology

SB 498 History and Systems of Psychology
3 credits (AS)

A comprehensive examination of the history and growth of psychology as an experimental and applied science from the 1850’s to the present. The course examines the development of psychology within the context of the social, cultural, and scientific history of the Western world. Prerequisite: SB 120 Introduction to Psychology, SB 326 Personality Theories, and senior standing

SB 499 Capstone I – Applied: Senior Project
3 credits (AS)

In the Capstone Seminar students focus on specific academic projects that integrate the knowledge and skills from their previous course work, and prepare them for the next stage of their professional development. The course stresses written, oral, and visual communication; pragmatic problem-solving skills; setting and achieving specific goals; and self-assessment. A major research paper will be written. (Offered fall and spring terms) Prerequisite: SB 375 Methods of Inquiry or HG 375 Historical Methods. Student must be eligible for graduation at the end of the term in which seminar is taken.