English

EN 099 Foundations of Writing
3 non-degree credits

Students will produce paragraph and short essay pieces while practicing grammar and technical control skills. This course prepares students for EN 100 Fundamentals of College Writing. Placement is based upon an entrance writing test. A minimum of grade of "C" is required to pass this course. The grade for this course will not be factored into the students’ grade point average (GPA); however, students who fail this course will be dismissed from the College. (Offered Pre-Freshmen Summer College Only)  Prerequisite: placement exam.

EN 100D Fundamentals of College Writing
3 non-degree credits

Students will write short essays including research and documentation using MLA style. This course prepares students for English 101 by introducing them to the fundamentals of college level academic writing. A minimum grade of "C" is required to pass this course. The grade earned in this course is factored into the students’ grade point average (GPA). However, the course does not count as academic credit toward the degree. Placement is based upon an entrance writing test. Ordinarily, students are expected to complete this course by the end of their first year of college (September to September or January to January). Students who participate in Summer College (August) prior to their first year of school must complete this course by the end of that academic year (May). Students who fail this course twice will be dismissed from the College.

EN 101 Academic Writing I
3 credits (AS)

A required component of the College General Education Program, Academic Writing I focuses on analysis and argument. Students will practice critical thinking and critical reading while developing essays to analyze texts and create an academic argument. Students must earn a C (74%) or higher in order to qualify for EN 201 Academic Writing II.

EN 110 The Field of English
1 credit (AS)

This second-semester course, funded by the First Year Program, introduces English majors and minors (and other interested students) to the discipline of English, prepares them for the three years to follow, and, working with the Center for Career and Extending Learning, suggests possible careers toward which a major or minor in English can lead. Transfer students should also enroll in this course. Taught by English and other interested faculty members, the course fulfills the spring semester First Year Program requirement. Included will be extra-class and off-campus activities.

EN 112 Stages
3 credits (AS)

"All the world’s a stage," Shakespeare wrote. Throughout history, thinkers seeking to understand the human condition have drawn on the concept of stages in the sense of interrelated but transforming historical eras, as periods of a human life, and as a metaphor drawn from theater to explain how we act in our daily lives. This interdisciplinary course focuses on issues relevant to literature, theater, art, and film, and their connections to everyday life. It is designed to help link studies of these different art forms to the ways we use the creative process to make sense of the world.

EN 201 Academic Writing II
3 credits (AS)

A required component of the College General Education Program, Academic Writing II emphasizes writing from research. Students will create analytical and short argument essays, research and analyze texts, and craft a variety of focused writings in order to enter an academic conversation through a sustained argument essay. Prerequisite: A "C" or better in EN 101 Academic Writing I.

EN 201H Academic Writing II Honors  
3 credits (AS)

In this course, reading assignments and writing projects will help students develop a mature style and insights into their own writing and the writing of professional writers. Current composition theory will provide students with a framework that invites them to explore the relationships among the writer, the reader, the world, and the message. The course may be focused on a theme such as language, 19th century capitalism, or immigration; and students will be expected to use a variety of approaches and points of view to explore this issue in their research, readings, classroom discussions, and writing assignments. Students will work collaboratively on some writing projects. In this course, a final proficiency exam is a required part of student assessment. Satisfies the All-College graduation requirement. (Offered spring term)  Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in EN 101 Academic Writing I, 3.0 grade point average, successful completion of all courses attempted, and permission of the instructor.

EN 210 Approaches to Literature: Analysis and Interpretation
3 credits (AS)

Students read, discuss, and write about fiction, poetry, drama and film. Students’ principal goals are to become attentive, careful readers and to develop a working knowledge of traditional and contemporary literary concepts. Logical analysis and interpretation along with careful, accurate academic writing are emphasized throughout. The course fulfills the General Education Cultural Literacy requirement. (Offered spring term) Prerequisite: Must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in EN 101 Academic Writing I.

EN 213 Creative Writing-Fiction
3 credits (AS)

Students read short stories by authors of different time periods and cultures to increase their knowledge of the forms and techniques of fiction. In-class workshops, peer critiquing, and short writing exercises help students develop their individual writing styles. Students produce several short stories or a novel excerpt. (Offered alternate spring terms)  Prerequisite: EN 101 Academic Writing I.

EN 214 Creative Writing-Poetry
3 credits (AS)

Students read poetry of different ages and nations in order to learn about the genre, its forms and techniques. They apply their knowledge in the many poems they write to increase their versatility and develop their own style. (Offered alternate spring terms)  Prerequisite: EN 101 Academic Writing I.

EN 216 Shakespeare and His Rivals
3 credits (AS)

In this class students read plays by Shakespeare, as well as selected plays by his contemporaries, imitators, heirs, descendants and adapters. Plays are studied in their dramatic, literary and cultural contexts. Particular attention is given to examining the works as performance texts. By examining both the similarities and the differences between Shakespeare and his rivals, students will gain a wider perspective on the playwrights and their periods. (Offered alternate fall terms)  Prerequisite: Must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in EN 101 Academic Writing I.

EN 221 Ethnic American Literature
3 credits (AS)

Students read and discuss important works by writers from different ethnic groups, such as African-American, Chicano, Jewish-American, and Native American. Writers are examined as individuals, as members of ethnic groups, and as participants in world culture. The course fulfills the General Education Cultural Diversity requirement. (Offered alternate spring terms) Prerequisite: Must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in EN 101 Academic Writing I.

EN 241 Children's Literature
3 credits (AS)

Students read from a variety of genres of children's literature and react orally and in writing to that literature.  Both literary and illustrative criteria are addressed.  A major analytical research paper is a course requirement and a creative project may also be assigned. The course fulfills the General Education Cultural Diversity requirement. (Offered alternate spring terms) Prerequisite: Must have completed or be concurrently enrolled in EN 101 Academic Writing I.

EN 312 Advanced Expository Writing
3 credits (AS)

Students read and write essays, building on and extending skills developed in lower-division courses. Emphasis is on reading analytically, interpreting texts, and drawing on new ideas. Through frequent workshops, the course fosters self-confidence and encourages writers to become proficient editors of their own work. (Offered spring term)  Prerequisite: EN 201 Academic Writing II.

EN 314 British Literature: To 1800
3 credits (AS)

Students read selected works by major British authors through the 18th century. Cultural and historical contexts are emphasized. The course requires a research-based paper on a writer of the student’s choice. (Offered alternate fall terms)

EN 315 British Literature: 1800-present
3 credits (AS)

Students read selected works by major British authors of the 19th and 20th centuries. Cultural and historical contexts are emphasized. The course requires a research-based paper on a writer of the student’s choice. (Offered alternate spring terms)

EN 321 Literature of the United States: 1800-1914
3 credits (AS)

Students read selected works by major U.S. writers of the period. Cultural and historical contexts are emphasized. The course requires a research-based paper on a writer of the student’s choice. (Offered alternate fall terms)

EN 322 Literature of the United States: 1914-Present
3 credits (AS)

Students read selected works by major U.S. writers of the period. Cultural and historical contexts are emphasized. The course requires a research-based paper on a writer of the student’s choice.  (Offered alternate fall terms)

EN 341 Myth and the Modern Mind
3 credits (AS)

Students study cultural and psychological theories about myth and myth-making and apply these theories to selected myths, both historical and contemporary. Sources examined include literature, traditional mythologies, folk and fairy tales, historical writing, popular culture, and advertising. (Offered alternate spring terms)

EN 351 Introduction to Post Colonial Literature
3 credits (AS)

This course focuses on a study of postcolonial literature within a global framework, emphasizing the political, historical, and cultural dimensions of selected texts. The course will begin with a study of late nineteenth-century imperial texts by such writers as Conrad and Kipling and move to recent literature by Soyinka, Achebe, Desai, Rushdie and others. Topics of discussion may include nationalism, race and gender. (Offered on a rotating basis) Prerequisite: EN 201 Academic Writing II.

EN 401 Narrative Structure: Prose and Dramatic Literature
3 credits (AS)

This course examines the relationship between form and content in narrative works of prose and dramatic literature. Analysis of the choices made by particular writers to organize the elements of their work helps students understand the workings of narrative literature. The course also examines the differences between narrative structure as written work and as dramatic performance. 

EN 441 Seminar: Genres and Movements
3 credits (AS)

Focusing on a particular genre or sub-genre of literature or on a literary period or movement, students participate in an advanced study of literary texts within their cultural contexts. Through the study and application of secondary theoretical and critical works, the course considers a variety of interpretive and analytic positions. Through consultation with English faculty, students will have the opportunity to propose and organize seminar topics. May be retaken with permission of the program director.

EN 451 Seminar: Writers in English and Translation
3 credits (AS)

Focusing on one or several closely-related writers, students participate in an advanced study of literary texts within their cultural contexts. The aim of the course is the interpretation and analysis of multiple works by a limited number of writers. Through the study and application of secondary theoretical and critical works, the course considers a variety of interpretive and analytic positions. Through consultation with English faculty, students will have the opportunity to propose and organize seminar topics. May be retaken with permission of the program director.

EN 463 Studies in Literature and Culture: 1900-Present
3 credits (AS)

Focusing on the concepts of modernism and postmodernism, students read selected works of the 20th Century with an eye toward what those works reveal about changing artistic visions of the human condition. The course introduces students to the important concepts of colonialism and post-colonialism and to certain aspects of the culture wars, such as the question of canon formation. Students will read closely, understand and apply a number of theoretical approaches to interpretation and interrogate the very notion of interpretation. The course requires a number of seminar papers and at least one larger, research-based project. (Offered alternate fall terms)

EN 475 Theoretical Approaches to Literature and Culture
3 credits (AS)

This course devotes itself to the broad range of philosophical theories of meaning, interpretation, and criticism shaping current work in the humanities and the impact of these theories upon both institutional and individual scholarly practices. Students will explore such topics as formalism, semiotics, structuralism, deconstruction, as well as political, psychological, race and gender-based approaches to literature and culture. (Offered spring term)

Summer Session I - July

  • Summer Term Begins
    May 20 2015
  • Memorial Day Holiday
    May 25 2015
  • Summer Term Ends
    Jul 1 2015